Friday Music Series

The Georgetown University Music Program’s Friday Music Series features acclaimed artists in free concerts on Friday afternoons now at 12:30 p.m.

Unless otherwise noted, events below are currently planned as live offerings, subject to change based on existing public health guidelines.

Please see below for details and check back for updates.

Spring 2022


Amy Domingues, viola da gamba

Amy Domingues performs on baroque cello and viola da gamba with groups as varied as The Folger Consort, Hesperus, The Washington Bach Consort, Sonnambula (which served as ensemble-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art), and Corda Nova Baroque. She appears on more than 70 albums, spanning genres as varied as indie rock, classical, folk, and experimental, and plays amplified gamba in the experimental/neo-classical duo Domingues & Kane. In this performance on viola da gamba, which in 17th-century England rivaled the lute as the instrument of choice to accompany songs and to play popular tunes, Domingues explores works for voice and viol by Tobias Hume, Henry Purcell, anonymous airs (tunes), and selections from the Manchester Gamba Book  (c. 1660)

Friday, February 11 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building

Please note that this first 2/11 Friday Music Series event of the season is only open to the Georgetown University community of students, faculty, and staff involved in the academic courses linked to the series.


Molly Joyce, composer and performer

Co-sponsored by the GU Music Program and The Program in Disability Studies

Composer and performer Molly Joyce was recently deemed one of the “most versatile, prolific and intriguing composers working under the vast new-music dome” by The Washington Post. Her music has additionally been described as “serene power” (New York Times), written to “superb effect” (The Wire), and “unwavering” and “enveloping” (Vulture). Her work is concerned with disability as a creative source. She has an impaired left hand from a previous car accident, and the primary vehicle in her pursuit is her electric vintage toy organ, an instrument she bought on eBay which suits her body and engages her disability on a compositional and performative level. This event will be ASL interpreted and Zoom captioned. For additional access needs, please email disabilitystudies@georgetown.edu.

Friday, February 18 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Kamyar Arsani, daf

Folklore Sufi songs from Kurdistan province, Iran

Performing on Daf (Iranian frame drum), Kamyar Arsani, an Iranian multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter based in Washington, DC creates music across an array of styles, ranging from classical Persian music to genre-defying electronic experimentation. He has been a featured artist at the Kennedy Center and the Library of Congress.

Friday, February 25 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Melvin Butler, Saxophone

Visiting Davis Professor Melvin Butler is an internationally acclaimed jazz saxophonist who has worked with Grammy-nominated Brian Blade and the Fellowship Band for more than two decades, as well as Betty Carter, Joey DeFrancesco, and Christian McBride. He is a featured soloist on the Grammy-winning recording by the John Daversa Big Band, and will be joined for this performance by pianist Prof. Paul Bratcher, Music Director of the GU Jazz Ensemble

Friday, March 18 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Washington Women in Jazz Festival with Amy K Bormet

Featuring Patricia Lopez (Uruguay) and WWJ Vocal Trio: Taylor Young, Taylar Lee, and Samiyah Muhammad

Amy K Bormet is a pianist, vocalist, and composer, known for her fearless free-wheeling style and dedication to creating new music. To collaborate with and celebrate women musicians, she started the annual Washington Women in Jazz Festival in 2011, directing, financing, and performing in an annual festival and women-focused events throughout the year in the DC area. She has formed several ensembles to perform and record her compositions, including L.A.-based quintet, AmyAna, co-led with Brazilian drummer Ana Barreiro; The Harold Trio, an instant composition ensemble with Tina Raymond, drums and Biggi Vinkeloe, saxophone/flute; and her quintet, Ephemera, a project of women’s poetry and improvisation.

Friday, March 25 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Music of Margaret Bonds

Singers from the Coalition for African Americans in the Performing Arts (CAAPA):

Marquita Raley-Cooper, Mezzo-soprano
Ayana Ogunsunlade, Soprano
Pamela T. Simonson, Soprano

Part of Georgetown University Music Program’s multi-year exploration of the works of Margaret Bonds, this concert features three singers from the Coalition for African Americans in the Performing Arts. It is also offered in conjunction with the April 2 concert featuring the GU Orchestra and GU Concert Choir, including Margaret Bonds’s “Credo” and excerpts from her Easter Cantata with words by Langston Hughes, “Simon Bore the Cross.”

Friday, April 1 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Chiarina Chamber Players

The Best Cuisine
Carl DuPont, baritone

Domenic Salerni, violin
Carrie Bean Stute, cello
Efi Hackmey, piano

Chiarina, a Capitol Hill-based chamber music series admired for its innovative programs and world-class artist roster, is a 2020 recipient of a Classical Commissioning Grant from Chamber Music America. In this April concert, Chiarina gives a sneak peek of its recipe-inspired commission “The Best Cuisine,” a work for voice and piano trio by GU Music Program Prof. Carlos Simon, who is also composer-in-residence at the Kennedy Center. With insights from the composer and his creative partner, Carl DuPont (baritone and Assistant Professor at the Peabody Conservatory), this special, one-time event is an exciting lead-up to the work’s evening premiere at St. Mark’s Church. This commission has been made possible by the Chamber Music America Classical Commissioning Program, with generous funding provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Performances in DC were made possible by The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Additional music on the program is by Dvořák (a selection from his festive “Dumky” trio), H. Leslie Adams, and C. Theofanidis.

Friday, April 8 at 12:30 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Brandon Camphor and OneWay

In 2007, Washington D.C-raised singer/ songwriter Brandon Camphor created OneWay, a vocal group that stylistically dances along the divide separating Christian pop and urban gospel music to create its own unique hybrid. The exhilarating ensemble has earned four Billboard Top 30 statuses since 2015. This concert is offered in conjunction with the 2 p.m. talk “Sacrifices of Praise: Unsung Forerunners of Praise and Worship in Black Gospel Music,” by Prof. Birgitta Johnson (Univ. of South Carolina), who has appeared in media outlets including Rolling Stone Magazine, NPR, Vox, and Public Radio International. The talk will explore underrecognized contributions of African American artists to the growth of praise and worship music, which many scholars, church musicians, and artists agree is one of the most powerful developments in black gospel music and contemporary Christian music (CCM) in the last 40 years. The Georgetown University Music Program’s Friday Music Series features acclaimed artists in free concerts on select Fridays at 12:30 p.m.

Friday, April 22 at 12:30 p.m. 

McNeir Hall, New North Building


“Sacrifices of Praise: Unsung Forerunners of Praise and Worship in Black Gospel Music”

By Prof. Birgitta Johnson (Univ. of South Carolina)

Prof. Birgitta Johnson (Univ. of South Carolina) has appeared in media outlets including Rolling Stone Magazine, NPR, Vox, and Public Radio International. The talk will explore under-recognized contributions of African American artists to the growth of praise and worship music, which many scholars, church musicians, and artists agree is one of the most powerful developments in black gospel music and contemporary Christian music (CCM) in the last 40 years.

Friday, April 22 at 2 p.m.

McNeir Hall, New North Building


Past Performances